Typography

 

So what title reflects? Personality- who’s personality?  And what it has to do with animation?

Yes, Personality animation has to do things with a CHARACTER. A Character could be anything. It can be a chair, lamp, tree, animal or a human.  A character’s personality is all about who the character is; how he thinks, how he acts, and probably most importantly: how he reacts to the things that are happening around him, to him, and to the other characters around him.”

In 1914 Winsor Mc Cay drew ‘Gertie the Dinosaur’ and McCay himself performed "live"in front of the projected animation, holding an apple in front of Gertie and inviting her to eat. Gerties lowered her long neck and swallowed the fruit- astounding the audience; this was the first 'personality' animation- the beginning of cartoon individuality. It was so like life that the audience could identify with Gertie. It was a sensation.
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In the twenties 'Felix the Cat' became as popular as Charlie Chaplin. These short cartoons were visually inventive, doing what camera can't do. But more importantly a real personality emerges from this flurry of silent, black and white drawings and Felix 'himself ‘connected with audience worldwide. 

Felix the Cat is a cartoon character created in the silent film era. His black body, white eyes, and giant grin, coupled with the surrealism of the situations in which his cartoons place him, combine to make Felix one of the most recognized cartoon characters in film history. Felix was the first character from animation to attain a level of popularity sufficient to draw movie audiences.

As quoted by Animator keith lango (http://www.keithlango.com) “Chaplin was a genius in his medium and he knew, “...that nothing transcends personality.” If you study his films, as the Disney animators did, you will find many rules that pop up again and again. One of them is: the personality of the victim of a gag will determine just how funny the whole incident will be. If a dignified person slips on a banana peel, it’s funny. If it happens to a person who is already down and out, it’s not.

In animation, as in life, personality is relative and powerfully unique. The best way to point out personality is to contrast it with another personality. So when you have two characters with distinct personalities in the same movie/setting it's easier to see their personalities (if you do it right). Even so, you can still show personality in isolation as well. If you want to imbue your characters with a strong sense of personality, then there are a few little tips you can keep in mind. One of them is to define you character's default power centre, and to use it to help define their unique personality.”

Disney's ‘Three little pigs’ had major impact on developing 'personality animation'- clearly defined and believable separate personalities acting so convincingly that the audience could identify with and root for them.

Objective of personality animation is to make character believable and acceptable by audience. Character is the heart of a story and gives flow to the story. If characters personality will not be defined properly; each character will look same while acting.

So what an animator should know for a personality animation? Following are the most important rules for making personality animation believable.

  1. Movement- every movement of character has to be for an obvious reason.
     
  2. Action- Every action must have a meaning and relate to situation, story and emotions.
     
  3. Mood and the attitude of a character should be reflected clearly. Walt Disney said, "In most instances, the driving force behind the action is the mood, the personality, the attitude of the character—or all three. Therefore, the mind is the pilot. We think of things before the body does them."
     
  4. Anticipation
     
  5. What character is thinking? His thought process while acting.
     
  6. Principles of animation like time, weight, secondary actions, volume, Appeal.

The objective is to give the characters in an animation a personality those appeals to the viewers. The different principles should be applied in a fashion to produce a consistent personality. This means that the animator must have a good idea of the desired personality before beginning the animation.

References:

Lasseter, John, "Principles of Traditional Animation Applied to 3D Computer Animation.
Thomas, Frank and Johnston, Ollie, Disney Animation— The Illusion of Life.
Whitaker, Harold and Halas, John, Timing for Animation.

Article by

Smita Pandey
smita@animationsupplement.com

 

So what title reflects? Personality- who’s personality?  And what it has to do with animation?

Yes, Personality animation has to do things with a CHARACTER. A Character could be anything. It can be a chair, lamp, tree, animal or a human.  A character’s personality is all about who the character is; how he thinks, how he acts, and probably most importantly: how he reacts to the things that are happening around him, to him, and to the other characters around him.”

In 1914 Winsor Mc Cay drew ‘Gertie the Dinosaur’ and McCay himself performed "live"in front of the projected animation, holding an apple in front of Gertie and inviting her to eat. Gerties lowered her long neck and swallowed the fruit- astounding the audience; this was the first 'personality' animation- the beginning of cartoon individuality. It was so like life that the audience could identify with Gertie. It was a sensation.
 

In the twenties 'Felix the Cat' became as popular as Charlie Chaplin. These short cartoons were visually inventive, doing what camera can't do. But more importantly a real personality emerges from this flurry of silent, black and white drawings and Felix 'himself ‘connected with audience worldwide. 

Felix the Cat is a cartoon character created in the silent film era. His black body, white eyes, and giant grin, coupled with the surrealism of the situations in which his cartoons place him, combine to make Felix one of the most recognized cartoon characters in film history. Felix was the first character from animation to attain a level of popularity sufficient to draw movie audiences.

As quoted by Animator keith lango (http://www.keithlango.com) “Chaplin was a genius in his medium and he knew, “...that nothing transcends personality.” If you study his films, as the Disney animators did, you will find many rules that pop up again and again. One of them is: the personality of the victim of a gag will determine just how funny the whole incident will be. If a dignified person slips on a banana peel, it’s funny. If it happens to a person who is already down and out, it’s not.

In animation, as in life, personality is relative and powerfully unique. The best way to point out personality is to contrast it with another personality. So when you have two characters with distinct personalities in the same movie/setting it's easier to see their personalities (if you do it right). Even so, you can still show personality in isolation as well. If you want to imbue your characters with a strong sense of personality, then there are a few little tips you can keep in mind. One of them is to define you character's default power centre, and to use it to help define their unique personality.”

Disney's ‘Three little pigs’ had major impact on developing 'personality animation'- clearly defined and believable separate personalities acting so convincingly that the audience could identify with and root for them.

Objective of personality animation is to make character believable and acceptable by audience. Character is the heart of a story and gives flow to the story. If characters personality will not be defined properly; each character will look same while acting.

So what an animator should know for a personality animation? Following are the most important rules for making personality animation believable.

  1. Movement- every movement of character has to be for an obvious reason.
     
  2. Action- Every action must have a meaning and relate to situation, story and emotions.
     
  3. Mood and the attitude of a character should be reflected clearly. Walt Disney said, "In most instances, the driving force behind the action is the mood, the personality, the attitude of the character—or all three. Therefore, the mind is the pilot. We think of things before the body does them."
     
  4. Anticipation
     
  5. What character is thinking? His thought process while acting.
     
  6. Principles of animation like time, weight, secondary actions, volume, Appeal.

The objective is to give the characters in an animation a personality those appeals to the viewers. The different principles should be applied in a fashion to produce a consistent personality. This means that the animator must have a good idea of the desired personality before beginning the animation.

References:

Lasseter, John, "Principles of Traditional Animation Applied to 3D Computer Animation.
Thomas, Frank and Johnston, Ollie, Disney Animation— The Illusion of Life.
Whitaker, Harold and Halas, John, Timing for Animation.

Article by

Smita Pandey
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